Latest Generation of Lionfish-Hunting Robot Can Find and Zap More Fish Than Ever

It’s round three of invasive lionfish vs. underwater robots It’s always cool to see lionfish while snorkeling or scuba diving. They’re spectacular-looking, and because they’re covered in flamboyant spines, they’re usually secure enough in their invincibility that they’ll mostly just sit there and let you get close to them. Lionfish don’t make for very good oceanic neighbors, though, and in places where they’re an invasive species and have few native predators (like most of the Atlantic coast of the United States), they do their best to eat anything that moves while breeding almost continuously. From a 2010 Oregon State study on a reef in the Bahamas: A single lionfish per reef reduced young juvenile fish populations by 79 percent in only a five-week period. Many species were affected, including cardinalfish, parrotfish, damselfish, and others. One large lionfish was observed consuming 20 small fish in a 30-minute period. As horrible as Continue reading Latest Generation of Lionfish-Hunting Robot Can Find and Zap More Fish Than Ever

Shot to the Gut: “Robotic” Pill Sails Through Human Safety Study

The autonomous, easy-to-swallow device administers a drug injection inside the intestines An average person with type 1 diabetes and no insulin pump sticks a needle into their abdomen between 700 and 1,000 times per year. A person with the hormone disorder acromegaly travels to a doctor’s office to receive a painful injection into the muscles of the butt once a month. Someone with multiple sclerosis may inject the disease-slowing interferon beta drug three times per week, varying the injection site among the arms, legs and back.    Medical inventor Mir Imran, holder of more than 400 patents, spent the last seven years working on an alternate way to deliver large drug molecules like these, and his solution—an unusual “robotic” pill—was recently tested in humans. The RaniPill capsule works like a miniature Rube Goldberg device: Once swallowed, the capsule travels to the intestines where the shell dissolves to mix two chemicals to Continue reading Shot to the Gut: “Robotic” Pill Sails Through Human Safety Study