Video Friday: TALOS Humanoid Robot, and More

Your weekly selection of awesome robot videos Video Friday is your weekly selection of awesome robotics videos, collected by your Automaton bloggers. We’ll also be posting a weekly calendar of upcoming robotics events for the next few months; here’s what we have so far (send us your events!): The Promise and the Peril of Artificial Intelligence and Robotics – October 23, 2018 – Corvallis, Oregon, USA Collaborative Robots, Advanced Vision & AI Conference – October 24-25, 2018 – Santa Clara, Calif., USA ICSR 2018 – November 28-30, 2018 – Qingdao, China RoboDEX – January 16-18, 2019 – Tokyo, Japan Let us know if you have suggestions for next week, and enjoy today’s videos.

Explore the World’s Coolest Robots, All in One Place

New IEEE site features 200 robots from 19 countries with hundreds of photos, videos, and interactives to get people excited about robotics and STEM We’re launching today a new massive guide to all things robotic, with over 820 photos, 680 videos, and 40 interactives. It’s a fun site designed for robot enthusiasts of all ages and backgrounds. You should go check it out right now. Seriously, stop reading this and go to robots.ieee.org. ⏳ ⏳ ⏳ Hey you’re back! Found some cool robots? Clicked on any creepy ones? We really hope there was something that captured your interest. A major goal of the ROBOTS site—which is an expansion of our Robots App from a few years back—is being a resource for anyone interested in robotics, no matter if you’re a beginner or a robot legend.

Boston Dynamics’ SpotMini Can Dance Now

A quadruped robot dance-off is inevitable At IROS in Madrid a few weeks ago, Marc Raibert showed a few new videos during his keynote presentation. One was of Atlas doing parkour, which showed up on YouTube last week, and the other was just a brief clip of SpotMini dancing, which Raibert said was a work in progress. Today, Boston Dynamics posted a new video of SpotMini (which they’re increasingly referring to as simply “Spot”) dancing to Uptown Funk, and frankly displaying more talent than the original human performance. 

AI on a MEMS Device Brings Neuromorphic Computing to the Edge

For first time artificial intelligence has been integrated into a MEMS device In order to achieve the edge computing that people talk about in a host of applications including 5G networks and the Internet of Things (IoT), you need to pack a lot of processing power into comparatively small devices. The way forward for that idea will be to leverage artificial intelligence (AI) computing techniques—for so-called AI at the edge. While some are concerned about how technologists will tackle AI for applications beyond traditional computing—and some are wringing their hands over which country will have the upper hand in this new frontier—the technology is still pretty early in its development cycle. But it appears that still-too-early-yet status is about to change a bit. Researchers at the Université de Sherbrooke in Québec, Canada, have managed to equip a micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) device with a form of artificial intelligence, marking the first time that any type of Continue reading AI on a MEMS Device Brings Neuromorphic Computing to the Edge

Video Friday: Boston Dynamics’ Spot Goes to Work, and More

Your weekly selection of awesome robot videos Video Friday is your weekly selection of awesome robotics videos, collected by your Automaton bloggers. We’ll also be posting a weekly calendar of upcoming robotics events for the next few months; here’s what we have so far (send us your events!): Japan Robot Week – October 17-19, 2018 – Tokyo, Japan The Promise and the Peril of Artificial Intelligence and Robotics – October 23, 2018 – Corvallis, Oregon, USA Collaborative Robots, Advanced Vision & AI Conference – October 24-25, 2018 – Santa Clara, Calif., USA ICSR 2018 – November 28-30, 2018 – Qingdao, China Let us know if you have suggestions for next week, and enjoy today’s videos.

Quadrotor Maintains High Speed Flight With Just Three Rotors

If you don’t mind a little spinning, quadrotors can operate just fine as trirotors In 2014, we wrote about some failsafe software from ETH Zurich that allowed a quadrotor to remain fully controllable even with one busted motor. The unbalanced torque generated by three motors means that a quadrotor can’t help but spin, but with a bit of cleverness, software can compensate for the spin and keep the quadrotor stable and even allow it to obey control inputs, allowing it to land more or less safely. This is a valuable capability, but there are a few things that it doesn’t address. For example, what if your quadrotor loses a rotor over an unsafe area? What if something happens to it when it’s already traveling at a high speed? Or what if it’s trying to deliver something and really needs to make it to its destination, no matter what? At IROS Continue reading Quadrotor Maintains High Speed Flight With Just Three Rotors

New FAA Rules for Drones Go Into Effect

The 2018 FAA Reauthorization Act brings a new regime for recreational flyers Last week saw the 2018 FAA Reauthorization Act become law, and the new legislation has quite a few implications for people who fly small drones or model aircraft as a hobby. Before diving into the latest changes, it’s worth reviewing how the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration has regulated such things in the past.

32-Legged Spherical Robot Moves Like an Amoeba

Mochibot is out to prove that there’s no such thing as too many legs Making a one-legged robot that moves is very hard. Two-legged robots are a little bit more straightforward in some ways, and four-legged robots are statically stable much of the time. You can see where this is going—there’s a general trend toward more legs being more stable and potentially easier to control, especially as terrain complexity increases. So what happens if you take that logic to an extreme? As it turns out, you end up with a spherical robot made of 32 individually actuated telescoping legs, named Mochibot.